Grilled Pork Chops

INGREDIENTS

• 4 tbsp. Newell Farmlands   All Purpose seasoning
• 4 small sweet potatoes   (about 1 1⁄2 lb total)
• 1 tbsp. olive oil
• Kosher salt and pepper
• 4 bone-in   pork chops   (about 2 lb total)
• 2 tsp.   ground cumin

DIRECTIONS

Heat grill to medium-high. In a large bowl, toss the sweet potatoes with the oil and 1/4 tsp each salt and pepper. Grill (reserve the bowl), turning often, until tender and slightly charred, 12 to 14 minutes. Transfer the potatoesback to the bowl.

Meanwhile, season the pork chops with Newell Farmlands All Purpose Seasoning, cumin and 1/4 tsp eachof salt and pepper. Grill until cooked through, 5 to 7 minutes per side.

Serve with the potatoes.

Make this dish for 8 by doubling the potatoes and using 3 small pork tenderloins (about 3 1/2 lb total), which take up less room on the grill, instead of chops. Season as directed and grill, turning occasionally, until a thermometer registers 145°F, 18 to 22 minutes; let rest for 5 minutes before slicing. Serve and Enjoy!

Meatloaf

INGREDIENTS

• 4 tbsp. Newell Farmlands   All Purpose seasoning
• 1 tbsp. olive oil
• 2 lb. ground beef
• 1/2 c. bread crumbs
• 2 eggs, lightly beaten
• 1 tbsp. tomato paste
• Kosher salt
• Freshly ground   black pepper
• 1/4 c. ketchup
• 1 tbsp.   brown sugar

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Season with Newell Farmlands All Purpose Seasoning, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally. Turn off the heat and stir in tomato paste. Let cool slightly.

Mix seasoning mixture with remaining ingredients in a large bowl into well combined. Mix the beef with the eggs and bread crumbs and press into a loaf pan (or shape into a loaf). Whisk together ketchup and brown sugar. Brush with ketchup mixture and bake for 45 minutes. Spread with more ketchup and bake for another 10 minutes, until the middle of the loaf reaches 155 degrees F.

Let cool for 10-15 minutes before serving and enjoy!

Turkey Burger

Turkey Burger

Harold Dieterle, the chef and an owner of two restaurants in Manhattan, Perilla and Kin Shop, cooks food that is often fiery and always immensely detailed. It resembles intricate music that is played very, very loud. This Jamaican-style jerk sauce is no exception. Its heat is towering, but it does not overwhelm the flavors that accompany the flames: thyme and allspice, along with wisps of caramelized sugar and a scent of rum. “You could serve it on chicken,” Dieterle told me. “It’s insane on ribs.” Not to mention pork tenderloin and bluefish. Jerk tofu? That’d be terrific as well.

Baked Salmon

Baked Salmon

Harold Dieterle, the chef and an owner of two restaurants in Manhattan, Perilla and Kin Shop, cooks food that is often fiery and always immensely detailed. It resembles intricate music that is played very, very loud. This Jamaican-style jerk sauce is no exception. Its heat is towering, but it does not overwhelm the flavors that accompany the flames: thyme and allspice, along with wisps of caramelized sugar and a scent of rum. “You could serve it on chicken,” Dieterle told me. “It’s insane on ribs.” Not to mention pork tenderloin and bluefish. Jerk tofu? That’d be terrific as well.

Baked Chicken

Baked Chicken

Harold Dieterle, the chef and an owner of two restaurants in Manhattan, Perilla and Kin Shop, cooks food that is often fiery and always immensely detailed. It resembles intricate music that is played very, very loud. This Jamaican-style jerk sauce is no exception. Its heat is towering, but it does not overwhelm the flavors that accompany the flames: thyme and allspice, along with wisps of caramelized sugar and a scent of rum. “You could serve it on chicken,” Dieterle told me. “It’s insane on ribs.” Not to mention pork tenderloin and bluefish. Jerk tofu? That’d be terrific as well.

Ribs

Ribs

Harold Dieterle, the chef and an owner of two restaurants in Manhattan, Perilla and Kin Shop, cooks food that is often fiery and always immensely detailed. It resembles intricate music that is played very, very loud. This Jamaican-style jerk sauce is no exception. Its heat is towering, but it does not overwhelm the flavors that accompany the flames: thyme and allspice, along with wisps of caramelized sugar and a scent of rum. “You could serve it on chicken,” Dieterle told me. “It’s insane on ribs.” Not to mention pork tenderloin and bluefish. Jerk tofu? That’d be terrific as well.